Break a Sweat

break_a_sweatMeasuring Your Response to Exercise 

by Ben Higgins, Caleb Bryce and Sarah Baumgart

Will walking create the same cardiac response as running? Physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits, even modest levels of physical activity (Janssen & Leblanc, 2010; Strong et al., 2005). However, many students remain largely inactive. This module is designed to promote student-specific physical activity as a health promotion strategy by introducing the concepts of vital signs and target heart rate training. Ideally, students will discover an enjoyable type of exercise and/or learn how to self-assess their cardiovascular responses (i.e. vital signs) to exercise to most effectively train.

Students learn: 1) How to measure basic vital signs, 2) How to calculate their own target heart rate, 3) To design their own workout plans, and 3) How exercise duration and intesnsity affect performance.

Docs: fulltext.docx   intro.pptx   wksht.docx
eywords: exercise physiology, heart rate, HS-LS1, human health, investigations, stability, structure, vital signs


Top Carnivore

top carnivoreTrophic Cascades and Predator-Prey Dynamics

by Veronica Yovovich and Dan Johnston

This module presents a “game” activity in which students learn about trophic cascades and how the different elements of a food chain interact. The module explores the importance of top-down regulation and how predators may regulate the habitats in which they live.

In this module, students learn: 1) How predators and prey interact, 2) How human activities may disrupt ecosystem integrity, 3) How to formulate predictions and hypotheses, 4) How to engage in argument from evidence, make and interpret simple graphs, and make estimates based on data they collect.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   handout.pdf   homework.pdf   cards.pdf
Keywords: argument, cause, data, evidence, food web, graphs, HS-LS2.A, HS-LS2.C, math, models, predators, prey, stability, systems, trophic cascades

Oil Pollution Solutions

oil pollution sollution

Oil Pollution in the Marine Environment

by Kristin deNesnera and Satina Ciandro

In this “hands-on” module, students learn about: sources of oil pollution in the marine environment; the effects of oil pollution on marine life, human health, and economies; examples of major oil spills; and the challenges involved in responding to and cleaning up an oil spill.

Students learn: 1) How human activities cause oil pollution, 2) How oil pollution affects marine resources, the environment, 3) About various oil spill clean-up technologies and sorbent materials absorptivity, and 4) About the challenges related to oil spill clean-up.

A video to accompany an inquiry based educational activity (module) used in the SCWIBLES program. Created by Kristin de Nesnera.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   lecture.pdf   activity.docx   costchart.docx
Keywords: clean up, data, engineering, HS-ESS3.A, HS-ESS3.C, HS-ETS1.C, HS-ETS2.B, explanations, investigations, marine, math, models, oil pollution, HS-PS1.A, questions, scale, stability, structure, systems

What’s Stomata With You?

what's stomata with youUsing Leaf Epidermal Peels to Determine Stomatal Density

by Catherine Wade and William Callahan

This module provides an opportunity for students to observe leaf stomata and make predictions about interactions between plants and environmental conditions. After introducing students to the basic form and function of stomata and discussing photosynthesis and transpiration, students will hypothesize about the distribution of stomata on the upper and lower leaf surfaces. Then, they make wet mount slides of leaf epidermal peels to view stomata under a microscope and calculate average stomatal densities for the top and bottom of the leaf.

Fellow Catherine Wade produced this video to explain the concepts behind leaf stomata and their importance in regulating water loss in plants.

Docs: fulltext.docx   worksheet.docx
Keywords: argument, communication, data, explanations, investigations, HS-LS1.A, HS-LS1.C, math, plants, prediction, questions, stability, stomata, structure, transpiration

Otters and Urchins

otters and urchinsEcology of The Kelp Forest

by Kristin McCully and Jack Horner

This multi-week modules is designed as a general introduction to ecology as a science, while exploring the excitement of the charismatic kelp forest ecosystem. It introduces the fields of population, community, ecosystem, and conservation ecology, and helps build skills in using equations, creating graphs, interpreting maps, and modeling ecological systems.

Docs: poplecture.pdf   ecolecture.pdf   commlecture.pdf   introlecture.pdf   conslecture.pdf   worksheets.doc   worksheetskey.pdf   studyguide.pdf   studyguidekey.pdf
Keywords: communication, data, ecosystem, explanations, graphs, kelp forest, HS-LS1.C, HS-LS2.A, HS-LS2.B, HS-LS2.C, marine food web, marine science, math, otters, patterns, scale, stability, systems, urchins

Hold Your Breath!

hold your breathby Vikram Baliga and Sarah Baumgart

This module helps students learn about the mammalian dive response. Students simulate a dive by submerging their faces in cold water for 30 seconds. They measure heart rate and body temperature before and after the “dive”. Students learn how the human body responds to stress (cold water) and they convey their findings using bar graphs and a final lab report.




Fellow Vikram Baliga produced this video to accompany his Dive Response module for inquiry-based education in high school science lab.

Docs: fulltext.docx   worksheet.docx
Keywords: body temperature, cause, data, dive response, graphs, heart rate, investigations, HS-LS1.A, math, questions, stability, systems

Ecosystem in a Jar

ecosystem in a jarExperimenting With Plant Growth

by Kristin McCully and Jack Horner

Students, as a class, develop, conduct, and analyze an experiment to determine what affects the growth of an “ecosystem in a jar.” “Ecosystems” include soil, water, plant seeds, and other items decided by the class in glass jars. Discussion should focus on experimental design and analysis, but instructor can incorporate ecosystem ecology, biodiversity, food chains and webs, photosynthesis and respiration, and other concepts of ecology and biology.

Docs: fulltext.pdf
Keywords: cause, communication, data, ecosystem, experimental design, investigations, jar, HS-LS2.A, HS-LS2.D, math, models, patterns, photosynthesis, plants, questions, respiration, stability, structure, systems

Vanishing Shells

vanishing shellsEffects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Life

by Tara Cornelisse and Bill Callahan

This project is an opportunity for students to learn how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere decreases the ocean’s pH and negatively affects shelled marine organisms. Students start with short informational videos and news readings, and then a real-life problem (an oyster business) as the context for designing questions, hypotheses, and investigating this phenomenon through hands-on experiments.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   labworksheet.pdf   labkey.pdf
Keywords: atmosphere, carbon dioxide, cause, data, HS-ESS3.C, HS-ESS3.D, explanations, investigations, marine, ocean acidification, oysters, pH, HS-PS1.B, questions, shells, stability, structure