Go Fish

Go_FishExploring Fisheries Management

by Rachel Zuercher, Ben Higgins, and Satina Ciandro

More than 1/3 of people in the world rely on fish as their major source of protein, however, global fisheries today face enormous challenges such as; overfishing, habitat loss, marine pollution and climate change. Fortunately, well-designed fisheries regulations can help mitigate these problems and ensure sustainability of fisheries into the future. Teaching students about fisheries can lead to a public that is informed regarding fisheries management, and a generation of conscious seafood consumers.

This module is an opportunity for students to learn: 1) The “tragedy of the commons” in the context of fisheries, 2) The components that make up a fishery, 3) Some of the causes of overfishing, 4) How fisheries regulations work, and 5) The benefits and costs of fisheries regulations.

Docs: GoFish_module_text.docx  West_coast_groundfish_template.pdf  intro.pdf   wrksht.docx   labwrksht.docx
Standards: HS-ESS3, Models, Cause and Effects, Systems
Keywords: cause communication economics fisheries HS-ESS3 math models natural resources systems tragedy of the commons

Exit Poll DemoGRAPHics

Exit_poll_demoGRAPHicsCollecting, Graphing, and Interpreting Exit Poll Data

by Elissa Olimpi, Jenny Lovell and Chrissy MacLean

Exit polls are used to determine or predict what people believe, how they feel about something, or in what way they will act. This module is designed to lead students through the process of designing an exit poll to answer a hypothesis about a local, state, or national election. The data they collect can be compiled and analyzed as if the poll were being presented on the news. In this way, students can gain a deeper understanding of one part of the legislative process.

Students learn: 1) What ballot measures are important to members of their community 2) How to poll the public, 3) How to generate graphical hypotheses and 4) How to create graphs in Google Sheets and interpret them.

Docs: fulltext.docx   form.docx   organizer.docx
Keywords: community, data, explanations, graphs, hypothesis, polling, questions

Gender Bender

Gender_BenderHow the Media Influences Our Gender Perceptions

By Jenny Lovell

Gender is a relevant and contentious topic that is constantly reinforced through non-verbal queues in the media. LGBTQA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning) issues are hotly debated in schools, courts, and public media venues. While most people think of gender as a simple binary (i.e. man or woman), gender is a complex and delicate continuum that includes many aspects that are not often discussed.

In this module, students will gain a better understanding of the complexity of gender and how stereotypes are perpetuated through popular media. By the end of the lesson students will learn: 1) The definitions and nuances of gender, 2) Strategies for analyzing images to uncover stereotypes and 3) How to verbally describe non-verbal queues contained in an image.

Docs: fulltext.docx   intro.pdf   activity.docx
eywords: argument, communication, gender, image analysis, LGBTQA, media, patterns, stereotypes

Argument from Evidence

argument from evidenceAssessing Argumentation Using the Topic of Fracking

by Jeff Jenkins, Chrissy MacLean and Dawn Krenz

Students living in rural communities impacted by ongoing and proposed extractive mineral development (fossil fuels and mining) will gain a greater appreciation and understanding for how different segments of society (government, corporate, and community) produce information to serve their own interests and how ‘factual’ information is often contested between these groups.

Students learn: 1) How to summarize the key points of an argument, 2) How to question the validity and subjectivity of information, and 3) How to summarize and convey a broad set of information in a succinct fashion.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   worksheet.docx
Keywords: communication, energy, facts, fossil fuels, fracking, governance, HS-LS2, models, patterns, structure, subjective

Tragedy of the Goldfish

tragedy of the goldfishSustainably Managing a Common Pool Resource

by Duran Fiack and Dan Johnston

The tragedy of the commons is a dilemma when multiple individuals, acting independently, deplete a shared, limited resource. Articulating solutions to the tragedy of the commons is one of the main problems of environmental policy and natural resource managers. In the absence of enlightened self-interest, altruistic or cooperative behavior, some form of authority is needed to solve the collective action problem.

In this module, students represent independent actors seeking to catch fish to support their livelihood. Students learn: 1) How human activities can cause resource depletion, 2) How interactions between individual actors are important in natural resource management, and 3) How to use data to make graphs and to discover trends over time.

Docs: fullltext.docx   lecture.pptx   info.docx   handout1.docx
Keywords: cause, common pool resource, environmental policy, graphs, HS-LS3.A, HS-LS3.B, HS-LS4.A, natural resource, patterns

Predict This!

predict this!

Using Models to Observe Correlation and Improve Predictions

by Caleb Bryce, Kim Goetz and Pablo Barrick

In this mini-activity, students measure the masses of specific numbers of beans and graph their data. From their graph they determine a linear model equation. Using their model, they predict the number of beans based on a given mass. The students are asked to create their own model for estimating the number of marbles in a large jar.

Students learn: 1) How to make graphs to depict data and to assess patterns; 2) How correlation can be used to construct a practical model; 3) How to use a model to predict what can not be easily measured; and 4) How to use evidence to support an argument.

Docs: fulltext.pdf
Keywords: argument, evidence, models, patterns, prediction, proportion, scale, systems


E-LiteracyEvaluating Online Sources

by Elissa Olimpi, and Chrissy MacLean

Students are faced with an overwhelming amount of information online and need to learn how to sift through available sources to find ones that are credible and appropriate for a specific research task. Many students have a basic understanding of the importance of evaluating sources, but have not practiced source evaluation. This lesson guides students through the process by highlighting questions that the student should ask of the source in order to decide if it is reliable.

Students learn: 1) A systematic approach for evaluating the credibility of internet sources 2) How to determine which sources to use for specific tasks, 3) How to cite textual evidence, and 4) How to corroborate or challenge claims.

Docs: fulltext.docx   intro.pptx   assessment.docx
Keywords: communication, evidence, sources


Says Who

says who.Deciphering a Scientific Article

by Hamutahl Cohen and Dan Johnston

The goal of this module is to teach students how to read and understand scientific articles. This skill can be applied to answering a variety of research questions from different disciplines of science and engineering. The context for this inquiry is the impact of climate change on a species. Although climate change is the specific prompt used here, the prompt can be modified for different classroom topics and different courses.

Students learn: 1) How to read a scientific article, 2) How to use scientific articles to answer questions, and 3) How to cite information in APA format.

Docs: fulltext.docx   intro.ppt   handout.docx   pikas.pdf   bears.pdf   turtles.pdf
Keywords: APA citation, cause, climate change, communication, HS-ESS3.C, HS-LS2.A, scientific articles


Toxic Avengers


toxic avengersTools for Uncovering the Human Geography of Pollution

by Jenny Lovell and Dawn Krenz

Environmental Justice (EJ) describes the trend of environmental impacts disproportionately affecting minority communities. It is a great subject to get students engaged about their neighborhoods and health. The Toxics Movement is closely related to EJ and shares the common interest of all people having the right to a clean and healthy environment.

Students learn: 1) How to look up public census data, 2) How to find toxic sites in their neighborhood, 3) How to formulate a testable question regarding census data and toxic sites, 4) How to synthesize data and draw conclusions that answer their questions, and 5) The key components of presenting a social science project to an audience.

Docs: fulltext.docx   presentation.pptx   activity.docx   checklist.docx
eywords: argument, cause, communication, data, environmental justice, mapping, questions, toxic sites


Splitting Atoms

splitting atomsArguments From Evidence to Address Nuclear Energy Policy

by Duran Fiack and Chrissy MacLean

In this module students represent the views of an interest group that either supports or opposes the expansion of nuclear-generated energy in the U.S. Students learn about the source of energy within the U.S. with a focus on the potential benefits and risks associated with expansion of nuclear energy.

In this module, students learn: How to formulate arguments from evidence, how to examine different views from a range of interest groups, how to evaluate a U.S. policy statement from an interest group perspective. Students will also learn how to understand the issues surrounding public policy decisions and the potential challenges of finding a political solution in a democratic society.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   intro.pdf   reading.pdf   groupnames.pdf   worksheet.pdf
Keywords: argument, cause, communication, HS-ESS3.A, HS-ESS3.C, HS-ESS3.D, evidence, nuclear energy, policy, scale

Oil Pollution Solutions

oil pollution sollution

Oil Pollution in the Marine Environment

by Kristin deNesnera and Satina Ciandro

In this “hands-on” module, students learn about: sources of oil pollution in the marine environment; the effects of oil pollution on marine life, human health, and economies; examples of major oil spills; and the challenges involved in responding to and cleaning up an oil spill.

Students learn: 1) How human activities cause oil pollution, 2) How oil pollution affects marine resources, the environment, 3) About various oil spill clean-up technologies and sorbent materials absorptivity, and 4) About the challenges related to oil spill clean-up.

A video to accompany an inquiry based educational activity (module) used in the SCWIBLES program. Created by Kristin de Nesnera.

Docs: fulltext.pdf   lecture.pdf   activity.docx   costchart.docx
Keywords: clean up, data, engineering, HS-ESS3.A, HS-ESS3.C, HS-ETS1.C, HS-ETS2.B, explanations, investigations, marine, math, models, oil pollution, HS-PS1.A, questions, scale, stability, structure, systems

The California Water Puzzle

the california water puzzleFreshwater Distribution Around California

by Tim Norris and Will Federman

Students research California’s fresh water supply and demand with sets of printed maps. They then solve the “California Freshwater Puzzle” based on their new knowledge of the geographies of freshwater supply (sources) and demand (uses) in California. This module is an opportunity for students to: learn how to read different kinds of maps, combine more than one source of information to make an analysis or an argument, learn about freshwater supply and demand in California, and solve the real-world problem of freshwater supply and demand in California.

Docs: fulltext.doc   prompt.docx   worksheet.docx   maps.pdf
Keywords: argument, HS-ESS3, evidence, mapping, water

A Matter of Human Proportions

a matter of human proportionsAre You Vitruvian?

by Vikram Baliga and Sarah Baumgart

This module is an opportunity for students to learn: 1) How to use the metric system to measure linear distances; 2) Whether proportions that exist between parts of the human body are consistent across individuals; and 3) How to form a hypothesis, analyze data, and argue whether evidence supports the hypothesis.
Docs: fulltext.docx   metric.pdf   worksheet.docx   instructions.docx   handout.pdf   stats.pdf
Keywords: argument, communication, data, evidence, explanations, human anatomy, hypothesis, investigations, HS-LS1.A, HS-LS1.B, HS-LS3.B, math, models, patterns, proportions, questions, structure, systems, vitruvian man

What’s Your Walk Score

what's your walk scoreWalkable Neighborhoods as Healthy, Social and Safe Communities

by Jeff Jenkins and Sarah Baumgart

Students in low income communities are increasingly faced with poor nutrition and limited exercise options. One way to combat this is to teach about walkable communities. Teaching about walkable communities will also get students to think about land use in their own neighborhood, will make them more aware of their surroundings, and will provide direction for improving their communities.

Students learn: 1) Why safe and healthy communities are related to walkability, 2) How walkability of neighborhoods/schools can be assessed through a walk score, 3) How to think about, interpret, and communicate spatial information, and 4) What factors in their community can be improved to increase walkability.

Students, particular those in low income communities, are increasingly faced with poor nutrition and exercise options. One way to combat this while also building community is to teach about walkable communities.

Docs: fulltext.docx   worksheet.docx
Keywords: communication, community, health, HS-LS2.A, HS-LS2.D, models, patterns, structure, sustainability, urban design, walk score, walkability

Controlling DNA

controlling DNA

Ethical Guidelines for the Use of DNA Technology

by Tara Cornelisse

In four 2-hour class sessions, AP Biology students receive enriched, in-depth Power Point lectures that accompany their study of Campbell’s AP Biology textbook to explain the mechanics of DNA modification, and engage in two different group activities to apply their understandings of both science and social issues through engaged ethical reasoning, debate, and presentations.

Docs: Fulltext.pdf   Worksheet.pdf   Lecture 1.pdf   Lecture 2.pdf
Keywords: bioethics, communication, debate, DNA, HS-ETS2.A, HS-ETS2.B, HS-LS3.A

Energy for Change

energy for changeGreen Energy Audit

by Jennie Liss Ohayon and Dan Johnston

Students and teachers can use parts or all of our step-by-step workbook to conduct an energy audit of their school. The whole module is designed to strengthen students’ understanding of concepts in physics such as power and energy by making real-world connections, and by using appropriate technology to inquire into their own environment (particularly the lighting systems of their school). They calculate potential energy savings from both behavioral (e.g., turning lights off) and operational (e.g., retrofits) measures. Finally, students synthesize their data and develop specific recommendations for administrators or the public.

Docs: Fulltext.pdf   Workbook.pdf
Keywords: data, energy, energy savings, explanations, green energy, investigations, math, power, HS-PS3.A, HS-PS4.C, questions

The Road to Sustainability

the road to sustainability

Closing the Loop by Achieving Zero Waste

by Tara Cornelisse

Students learn that the products they own go through a materials economy that includes natural resource extraction, production, distribution and themselves as consumers and disposers. Learning that this is unsustainable, students do a waste characterization of school trash and calculate the percent of trash that can be diverted from landfills with the goal of zero waste.

Docs: Full text.pdf
Keywords: data, HS-ESS3.A, HS-ESS3.C, explanations, investigations, life cycle analysis, math, patterns, questions, sustainability, systems, zero waste